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20120928
20121006
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Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)
. the challenger was ronald reagan. everybody knows how the election came out that year. that's not what we're talking ant here. what we're talking about is who won that first debate. incumbent president jimmy carter or was it the challenger, ronald reagan? >> leaving cleveland this morning, the president had a message for anyone who thought reagan had come across better in the debate. >> i think the issues are more important than the performance. >> the president is visibly more relaxed today than he was on the stage with governor reagan last night. since there's no way to know yet for sure which man helped himself the most, it's likely that the president is simply relieved that the debate that many of his advisers never wanted in the first place is finally behind him. >> relieved that it is over. so that was the coverage the day after the reagan/carter debate. because reagan went on to win the election that year, retrospectively that 1980 debate has been inviewed with a lot of over the top reagan worship stuff about his there you go again line and his are you better off than you were four
, because you weren't even born in 1980. >> i was not, yeah. >> but ronald reagan, people forget, before the debate, ronald reagan was painted as this looney, right-wing fanatic that would start world war iii, dr. strangelove, and it was the debate that stuck a needle in that balloon. >> i remember it well. >> not even born yet. i mean, this is romney's chance. >> sure. >> to connect with the american people. >> to pick up on mike's point, fascinating number from the poll is this. 51% of people who said they had heard or read something about romney in the last couple weeks said what they had heard or read made them think more negatively about him. more positively, that number was 48%. they've heard him going into this debate. this provides them a chance to say, listen, that guy you saw in the video, that's not me. i'm a different type of person. he can reset in that sense. i'm sort of with al on this. i spent a lot of time over the past week watching all of romney's debates from 2002. i watched every single debate. there were five of them. i read hundreds of clips in 2002. he was against
became. the big issue, big change began in 198 1980 that goes with the election of ronald reagan ronald reagan brought with them to washington a very underrated figure in a recent american history, somehow i don't think gets his due as an important person. that's edwin meese because edwin meese at first was in flash and then attorney general. said look, there has been a liberal agenda at the supreme court. there needs to be a conservative agenda at the supreme court. what was that agenda? expand executive power and end racial preferences, speed up execution, welcome religion into the public sphere, and above all, reverse roe v. wade and allow states once again to ban abortion. a big part of the reagan revolution was the arrival of washington of a group of young and committed conservative lawyers who wanted to work in that, on behalf of that agenda, who were two of the best and the brightest of that group? john roberts and samuel alito. 1970 -- in 1985, a memo at the solicitor general's office, alito wrote what can be made of this opportunity to advance the goal of bringing about the eve
ronald reagan did in his debate against jimmy carter. people don't remember all the facts and figures, the recitation of the facts and figures, they remember a significant line or a significant phrase that brings them back to reality. >> senator john mccain is the only man who has debated both of these individuals. he weighed in on the expectations this morning. take a listen. >> serve and provide us -- >> it's not just that they go bankrupt, he doesn't understand -- >> comments that grabbed everybody's attention. because frankly, the candidates are too well prepared. they're well scripted. >> what you did not hear the beginning there, is the senator said i think you're going to see more viewers, than any debate in history. and then he also said he can't remember the last time that any of these things affected the outcome of a presidential race. save 1960 and 2000, have the debates ever really impacted the outcome of a race, chris kofinis? >> it's funny, i hear the debate about debates not necessarily mattering. and i actually disagree with that i think the 1980, the reagan/carter deb
, the big change began in 1980 with the election of ronald reagan because he brought with him to washington a very underrated figure in the recent history, some i don't think this is due as an important area and that is edwin meese because he was first an advisor and then as attorney general said look, they're has been a liberal agenda at the supreme court of their needs to be a conservative agenda at the supreme court. what was the agenda? expand executive power and attend to a system for americans from a speech that execution, welcome religion into the public sphere and above all, reverse roe v wade in the last months again to the abortion. a big part of the revolution was the arrival in washington of a group of young and committed conservative lawyers who wanted it to work on behalf of the agenda. word the best and brightest in your group? john roberts and samuel alito. in 1985 in a memo plotting the litigation strategy of the solicitor general's office, he wrote what can be made of this opportunity to advance the goal of bringing about the eventual overruling of roe v wade? later that y
amiable, if not direct. mitt romney, and i'm not comparing it to 1980 and ronald reagan being an appealing alternative, but jimmy carter, not a bad alternative. i think that could eat into the president's support and more than just the undecided voter support. what do you think? >> not necessarily. because what voters too often and we see this and a lot of data. they complain and gripe, especially well as down in the polls. when it comes down to it on election day they usually hold their nose, suck it up and vote for their party leader. that is why we have undecided voters. usually if you're a member of your party by election day you aren't going to vote for the guy neil: i know you do this in far more exhaustive detail that idea, but i am old and remember 1980 and to remember that the undecided voters at the time, jumped either ronald reagan or jimmy carter. it turns out a lot more did. i'm not saying that there is some truth to what you're saying. those who are leery of that party or the candidate of that party would jump, could jump if they are disenchanted enough with their own who cho
and ease that ronald reagan projected and jimmy carter looked defensive. that's the impression that often lasts. >> even al gore and george w. bush is a good example of body language so much during those debates. al gore was up in the polls and had a series of very poor debate performances. >> al gore had been a very effe effective, aggressive debater. he was seen in the first debate as too aggressive. the sighs and the rest. in the second debate he was almost too laid back. by the third he had a just right approach by that time. those performances and all the other factors in the 2000 election held him back. >> humor. >> humor can be very important but it's something that has to -- some humorous lines probably are prescripted. there you go again, reagan, most people feel, was prepared. >> remember what lloyd benson said about -- >> yes. >> dan quayle. >> that famous line. i knew jack kennedy. jack kennedy was a friend of mine. senator, you are no jack kennedy. >> i just reread about all the debates, they prepared that line in advance because dan quayle made that comment over and over aga
reagan and carter in 1980. the confidence and ease that ronald reagan projected and jimmy carter looked a little bit defensive. that's the impression that lasts. >> even al gore and george w. bush i think is a good example of body language told so much during those debates. al gore was up in the polls and had a series of very poor debate performances. >> al gore had been a very effective, aggressive debater. in the first debate, he was seen as being too aggressive. the famous sighs and all the rest. in the second debate, he was almost too laid back. by the third he had a kind of just right approach, but by that time, those performances and all the other factors in the 2011 election held him back. >> how important is humor? >> it can be very important, but it's something that has to -- i guess some humorous lines probably are prescripted. there you go again by reagan most people feel w prepared. that, of course, is the magic. >> remember what lloyd benson said about dan quayle and president kennedy. >> yes, that was the famous line, jack kennedy was a friend of mine. senator, you're no j
a consistent advantage over ronald reagan but the final presidential debate changed everything leading to a reagan landslide. now he is building a lead in key battleground states, a consultant who worked for jimmy carter, finding the right sample to survey can be tricky. >> we know from exit polls that republicans tend to respond to these polls less than oftentimes particularly to news organizations less than do democrats. >> reporter: in. >> julie: 8 there was a huge swing. dukakis lost to bush. in 1992 incumbent president was down nine points in mid-september and was tied with bill clinton by the end of october. the clinton eventually won. former clinton pollster is questioning the assumptions being made in today's polls. >> these polls are assuming that you have the same high level of african-american, latino and young people vote in 2012 that you had in 2008. >> obama campaign senior advisor david axelrod said they widely vary so when they all pointed in one direction, they are all wrong. but we are planning for a close race as we always have. another democratic strategist offered
to that wonderful by ronald reagan, there you go again. >> how much you want to bet, it doesn't work? >> $10,000 bet? >>> on the eve of election day in ohio, they are sleeping overnight at polling places. we'll go live to cleveland where nina turner is camping out for early voting. >>> and house majority leader eric cantor is fighting for his political life in his own district. wayne powell will join me live following tonight's big debate. >>> good evening, americans. good to have you with us. republicans are hoping for a game changer in the next few days, but romney's path to victory is starting to disappear. president obama is ahead in all of the vital swing states needed for victory. if the election were held today an associated press analysis shows president obama would win at least 271 electoral votes. 270 votes wins the presidency. the romney campaign, no doubt, is struggling to, say the least. romney's own running mate was forced to admit how their campaign has stumbled. >> so, yeah, we have had some missteps, but at the end of the day, the choice is really clear. we're giving people a clear
or whether it was george w. bush or ronald reagan or bill clinton? do they approached these debates differently or do the american people view it differently when you have a sitting president? >> i think so, yes. one of the things that happens is the incumbent is at somewhat of a disadvantage being placed on an equal footing as the challenger, as we talked about before. incumbents have typically had a very rough time in the first debate. i am thinking back to jimmy carter in 1980. ronald reagan in 1984. george h. w. bush in '92. all of these guys who had been in the presidency, they got on that debate stage and came face- to-face with the challenger. it is rattling. they all had a very difficult time getting through the first debate. in each case, they had to up their game as the series went forward. >> you say, "the morning after >> you say, "the morning after the debate, will the media the
for ronald reagan the first time and then trickle-down economics nearly killed our family. i watched clinton fix the budget and change everything and it was great. then i watched it all go bad again. to the vice presidential candidates, i just feel that biden is thata hug and he makes his gaffes and you have to chuckle, nothing serious, but he always brings up his family and talks of his constituency. then you go to paul ryan. i have watched paul ryan on c- span for many years. i watched him come into power in the congress. he started out as a page. he pretty much was under the radar for many years, and around with a group of youngsters. then in the last few years he has teame, with his budget. everybody patted him on the back for doing something, including me, because he really had not done anything up until then. this constituency is not based on any big city in milwaukee, so he could pretty much say what he wanted and his constituency did not watch c-span. they did not really know the guy. but they know him now. warm hughere's no there. i'm in the age group where it will not affect me if
or ronald reagan or bill clinton? do they approached these debates differently or do the american people view it differently when you have a sitting president? >> i think so, yes. one of the things that happens is the incumbent is at somewhat of a disadvantage being placed on an equal footing as the challenger, as we talked about before. incumbents have typically had a very rough time in the first debate. i am thinking back to jimmy carter in 1980. ronald reagan in 1984. george h. w. bush in '92. all of these guys who had been in the presidency, they got on that debate stage and came face-to-face with the challenger. it is rattling. they all had a very difficult time getting through the first debate. in each case, they had to up their game as the series went forward. >> you say, "the morning after the debate, will the media the talking about knockout punches? who knows? a little boldness might make good politics." what do you mean? >> i mean this idea of not approaching this debate as an awful obstacle you have to get over but taking advantage of that opportunity. even for the guys like
to be there and are eager to make their case. bill clinton was like that. ronald reagan was like that. these two are not like that. for them, this is more, please do not let me do anything wrong, than, what can i do right? as was discussed earlier, he needs a dramatic moment to shift the momentum. if he is intimidated by the experience or feeling boxed in, he is less likely to do that. for obama, it is more a question for maintaining his lead. he does not want to do anything right now that reverses the trajectory he is on. i would expect he is a literate -- a little timid as well. >> if you look at past debates, one dealing with policy, the d, the with gerald forwar other is more style, where obama made a joke about his age. how much is policy and how much a style in these debates? >> i think probably my judgment would be a lot of the stylistic -- a lot of it is stylistic. it is the way they come across to the voters. it is not necessarily as much what they are saying as how they are saying it. every once in awhile, it is itchly more of a case of glti avoidance. to do with lot with their handler
, ronald reagan speech writer and adviser has long argued that there is no such thing as a bradley effect. the bradley effect is named for mayor tom bradley of los angeles when he ran against george deukmejian did not do as well in the final balloting is he had been doing in the polling. for years pundits have ascribe that to the brad the affected people are free to say they're not going to vote for african-american because they don't want to be up to the prejudice he they're talking anonymously to pollsters. and he has all the data, and i believe him, but i believe that even if the bradley effect was not true in 1982, latest here in 2012. there is a significant number of people, not for reasons related to race, but for reasons related to the nature of the democratic partisanship who are refusing to tell pollsters that they're not going to vote for president obama. there are quite frankly scared of the machine. and if you are a fan of chick-fil-a you know what i'm talking about. [applause] interestingly enough their is a potential vice presidential pick for each of these regions in each o
an extra dollar i get to keep more of it. the old republican line that you heard from ronald reagan and it worked for him and i guess they decided not to get into the details of it. >> shannon: a very meaty interview. thanks for the inside scoop. >> chris: thank you. >> shannon: catch the entire interview right here on the fox news channel. it airs after america's news headquarters. a disturbing case out of massachusetts. 20-year-old man pleads guilty to raping a 14-year-old girl. the girl got pregnant and now the admitted rapist wants visitation rights to the child. an exclusive investigation by the boston fox affiliate. here is mike bodette. >> reporter: the superior court judge is defending what he did, saying his primary purpose was to get the father to support the child financially and that visitation rights are not up to him. but visitation rights are just what the rapist is now look for and the victim's attorney is still blaming the judge for opening up the door to the possibility. the back and forthcoming as a state rep plans to file a bill to close the loophole in massachus
for ronald reagan. is there a way -- are you doing anything to get into the race cycle with obama and romney? host: what do you say? we had a similar question from twitter. guest: right now i'm excluded from the first debate. the commission is the presidential debate commission and that is private and made up of republicans and democrats with no interest in seeing a third voice on stage. we have filed three lawsuits to get me on stage based on other third-party candidates who have there doesn't seem to be much hope. we filed on the antitrust round, -- browns. -- grounds. something that has not been done before. host: how much do these debates matter and what are you looking for to hearing on wednesday? guest: the debates are tantamount to me having a chance of winning. you can close the lid on winning the election. is winning getting enough votes to cause one of the other two who ends up winning to give more than just lip service to these issues? potentially. you know, steve, i view this as a victory every single day. there are so many people -- i think i speak on behalf of the majority of a
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)